business

Samsung admits to using unsustainable tin

Mounds of mining waste with forest in the distance.

Photo: © Friends of the Earth

Friends of the Earth supporters have forced the world's biggest-selling smartphone maker to confirm that it uses forest-trashing tin in its products.

Samsung, a multi-billion pound company, has investigated its supply chain and discovered that it uses Bangka Island's tin. This tin mining is destroying tropical forests, coral reefs and livelihoods.

Show us why green is working

Queue of people wearing green helmets outside the Treasury

Photo: © Friends of the Earth

Over 200 people joined together at the Treasury to send a clear message to the Government that green is working.

You can also send a message to George Osborne about the vital role that green jobs play in the economy.

All you need do is:

Support the Green Investment Bank

Hands holding coins

Photo: iStock

In 2010 Friends of the Earth supporters helped persuade the Government to set up a Green Investment Bank.

A similar bank in Germany helped boost clean energy, created jobs and bolstered the economy.

The Chancellor, George Osborne, is holding the bank back by stopping it from borrowing the money it needs to boost clean British energy generation and energy saving.

Stop the El Quimbo Dam project

View of river with wooded banks on a sunny day

The River Magdalena, Colombia. Photo: RitaCuba

The El Quimbo Hydroelectric Project is the first dam in Colombia built entirely by a multinational corporation, Emgesa. The dam would create a lake of about about 8,250 ha, almost twice the size of Lake Vyrnwy.

European banks fuel hunger

Woman and child with a sign saying No land, No food

Photo: Friends of the Earth International

European banks, pension funds and insurance companies are increasing global hunger and poverty. They are speculating on food prices and financing land grabs in poorer countries, according to a new report by Friends of the Earth Europe.

The report analyses the activities of 29 European banks, pension funds and insurance companies. These include:

The Lake Victoria land-grab

Man standing on felled trees

A man stands on the land taken from him to make way for a palm oil plantation. Kalangala, Uganda. Photo: Jason Taylor

The Ugandan government is promoting large-scale agrofuels plantations as a solution to the climate crisis at the UN climate talks in Durban, South Africa. Yet millions of people are already facing the impacts of land grabs and evictions caused by agrofuels.

Goldcorp damages health in Honduras

Mother holding young child with blisters on its back

Child with a skin disorder. Photo: Madre Tierra

Madre Tierra (Friends of the Earth Honduras) has denounced the health problems in Valle de Siria caused by a subsidiary of the Canadian gold company Goldcorp.

When was the last time you felt happy?

Three rats in a maze looking at a sign saying Work harder, happiness is just around the corner.

When was the last time you felt real happiness? Was it when you were together with people you like, when you were doing useful work that you’re good at? Was it when you were enjoying music, dancing, arts or sports? Or was it when you bought another product advertised to bring you happiness?

Palm Oil Day of Action

Eight people in orang-utang masks

Cardiff Friends of the Earth palm oil campaign stall, Queen Street Photo: Lindsay Maiden, Cardiff Friends of the Earth

Palm Oil Day of Action

29 October 2005 - Queen Street, Cardiff

Big business is clearing rainforest in south east Asia to make way for palm oil plantations. This has a devastating impact on wildlife and local communities.

Palm Oil

Palm oil protest stall Queen Street, Cardiff

Cardiff Friends of the Earth palm oil campaign stall, Queen Street Photo: Lindsay Maiden, Cardiff Friends of the Earth

Demand for palm oil, a vegetable oil, is the most significant cause of rainforest loss in Malaysia and Indonesia.

Palm oil is found in 10 per cent of supermarket products. These include:

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