Corporate accountability

Stop the killings in Honduras

Berta Cáceres. murdered. Nelson Garcia, murdered. Gustavo Castro, in danger

In the last two weeks four activists have been shot in Honduras. Two are dead and one is still in grave danger.

Berta Cáceres was an indigenous leader and celebrated defender of the environment. She opposed the Agua Zarca mega-dam project in Honduras. On 2 March Berta was shot dead in her own home.

Murder over Guatemala's palm oil fields

Rigoberto Lima Choc

On September 18, environmental activist Rigoberto Lima Choc was murdered in Northern Guatemala. This happened just after a court upheld charges he filed denouncing massive pollution caused by a palm oil company called Reforestadora de Palma de Petén (REPSA).

More phone companies come clean

Mining waste with forest in the background

© Friends of the Earth

Nokia, Sony, Blackberry, Motorola and LG now have all publicly accepted that their phones probably contain environment-trashing tin from Bangka Island.

Last week we wrote to these big mobile phone producers to let them know that we were turning our attention to them. We told them that over 25,000 people have contacted Apple and Samsung and that they could expect to hear from lots of you soon.

Ask Apple to come clean

Tin mining waste heaps with forest beyond

Photo: © Friends of the Earth

For the past six months Apple has ignored the questions from 25,000 Friends of the Earth supporters about the hidden impact of its iPhones. Stories of child labour and environmental destruction have been met with silence.

Now Apple has released a statement about Bangka island:

Turn up the heat on Apple

Mining spoil heaps with tropical forest in distance

The devastation caused by tin mining on Bangka Island © Friends of the Earth

Thousands of emails from our amazing suporters forced Apple's biggest rival, Samsung, to confirm that it uses forest-trashing tin from Indonesia's Bangka Island in its products.

But Apple is still refusing to go public about whether its phones contain tin from Bangka Island.

Samsung admits to using unsustainable tin

Mounds of mining waste with forest in the distance.

Photo: © Friends of the Earth

Friends of the Earth supporters have forced the world's biggest-selling smartphone maker to confirm that it uses forest-trashing tin in its products.

Samsung, a multi-billion pound company, has investigated its supply chain and discovered that it uses Bangka Island's tin. This tin mining is destroying tropical forests, coral reefs and livelihoods.

Samsung admits to using unsustainable tin

mined land with forest in the background

Photo: © Friends of the Earth

Friends of the Earth suupporters have forced the world's biggest-selling smartphone maker to confirm that it uses forest-trashing tin in its products.

Samsung, a multi-billion pound company, has investigated its supply chain and discovered that it uses Bangka Island's tin. This tin mining is destroying tropical forests, coral reefs and livelihoods.

Smartphones destroy forests and coral reefs

Spoil heaps and holes full of water with tropical forest in the background

© Ulet

Research by Friends of the Earth has found that smartphones sold by Samsung and Apple almost certainly contain tin from Indonesia where mining is devastating forests and farmland, coral reefs and many communities.

Tin is used for solder in phones, computers, and all other electronic gadgets. Around a third of the world's tin comes from Bangka and neighbouring island Belitung.

Cut Europe's land footprint

Mechanical digger loading soil onto a lorry

Photo: Friends of the Earth Europe

Europe has one of the largest land footprints in the world because it imports massive amounts of food and other goods from the rest of the world every year. These goods, such as meat, dairy and forestry products, need large areas of land.

Europe's high levels of land consumption:

Stop the El Quimbo Dam project

View of river with wooded banks on a sunny day

The River Magdalena, Colombia. Photo: RitaCuba

The El Quimbo Hydroelectric Project is the first dam in Colombia built entirely by a multinational corporation, Emgesa. The dam would create a lake of about about 8,250 ha, almost twice the size of Lake Vyrnwy.

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